Keeping what I need to know at finger’s length

I’ve been trying to cram in so much information so quickly, I’m starting (hah!) to realize that it’s not all sticking.

So, what better tool to use than Emacs to solve my problem with not remembering Emacs commands?

My solution is simple—create a cheat-sheet. The great thing about Emacs is that this doesn’t have to be a piece of paper, it can be a file that I can maintain in org-mode, just like this blog. In fact, I can also maintain it as a page on the blog. And with the most trivial bit of elisp, I can make sure that I can get to it with no more than two easy-to-remember keystrokes:

(define-key global-map [?\C-h ?\C-h]
  '(lambda ()
     (interactive)
     (view-file "~/org/doyouevenlisp.com/cheatsheet.org")))

Refining org2blog

No updates to be made, because I spent the entire day working on org2blog. I actually kinda liked it. A lot.

I’ve now rewritten the XML-RPC back-end to use the new, documented, WordPress API. Right at the moment, this is just running-in-place, but I hope to use the new code to simplifying things more.

No Weekly Wrapup today

Instead, I spent the time I would normally allocate to writing something for “Do you even lisp?” to enhancing org2blog, the software I’m using to manage this blog.

Well, enhancing might be saying a lot—since I’ve been doing a little WordPress hacking in other contexts, I’ve become aware of WordPress’ new (released with 3.4, so only six months old at this time) “native” XML-RPC API, and I chose to start moving org2blog to use that, and move it away from the hodge-podge of Blogger and MoveableType and metaWeblog APIs that are currently in use.

I hope that over time this will simplify the API, and perhaps result in even better possibilities for interaction—it would, of course, also be great if we could start to abstract away the specifics of a blog’s back-end requirements into a well-defined API so we could easily use whatever is the most featureful back-end for a given blog.

Others might see if differently; we’ll know when I start sending in merge requests.

I also want to automate the process of storing local copies of articles in a hierarchy that mirrors their permalinks and a couple of other things. That I’m also effectively learning elisp at the same time will make all of that very interesting.